aikido

What is Aikido?

Aikido is the self defence system developed by Japanese martial arts master 'Morihei Ueshiba' (1883-1969).

Master Ueshiba is refered to as O'Sensei (Great Teacher).

As a young man master Ueshiba trained extensively in several varieties of Jujitsu, as well as Sword and Spear fighting. Eventually he created his own art.

The name of masters Ueshibas art changed several times, but after the second world war the name Aikido was finally settled on.

Master Ueshiba was deeply religious; he studied and developed an ideology devoted to universal harmony.

Incorporating these principles into his martial art, Ueshiba developed Aikido in line with his philosophical and religious beliefs.

 

To injure an opponent is to injure yourself.
To control aggression without inflicting injury is the Art of Peace.

- Morehei Ueshiba

Aikido offers many benefits to it's practitioners

  • Self defence ability brings confidence, teaching us to dealt with adversity
  • Physical activity brings improved fitness
  • Ancient Japanese tradition, provides great interest to many
  • Character development through the demonstration of compassion and relaxation
  • It is a discipline, requiring us to master our fears and our pride, improving our daily lives

Aikido has not been created primarily as a system of combat, but rather a means of self-cultivation and improvement. It is an art which, is opposed to violence, conflict, and competition, stressing the importance of self development, rather than the defeat of others.

Aikido techniques generally work with the force of an attack, avoiding direct opposition. Great physical strength is not required to perform them effectively.

Most practice is done with a partner. Each works at their own level of ability, alternating as 'attacker' and 'defender'. Both roles are important as each develops skills that enhance overall sensitivity and control.

Increased co-ordination, speed, stamina, flexibility, and muscle development occur naturally as a result of training, but the techniques themselves do not depend on strength for effectiveness.

Since Aikido's movements and techniques arise from the most efficient utilization of the entire being, great power can be developed by the practitioner, regardless of physical strength.

Proficiency in Aikido is simply a matter of sustained and dedicated training; improvement comes from practice and personal effort.

A rewarding journey!